About Dr. Groothuis


Dr. Douglas Groothuis is a member of the Evangelical Theological Society, Evangelical Philosophical Society, and Society of Christian Philosophers. Dr. Groothuis received a PhD and a BS from the University of Oregon, and an MA in philosophy from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He has served as adjunct professor at Seattle Pacific University, visiting instructor in apologetics for Westminster Theological Seminary, and instructor at the University of Oregon .

He is the author of Christian Apologetics: A Comprehensive Case for Christian Faith, Unmasking the New Age, Confronting the New Age, Revealing the New Age Jesus, Christianity That Counts, Deceived by 0e2935523_1393371674_doug-groothuis-faculty-2014the Light, Jesus in an Age of Controversy, The Soul in Cyberspace, Truth Decay, On Pascal, and On Jesus. He has written for scholarly journals such as Religious Studies, Sophia, Research in Philosophy and Technology, Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, Philosophia Christi, Trinity Journal, and Asbury Theological Journal as well as for numerous popular magazines such as Christianity Today, Moody Magazine, The Christian Research Journal, Christian Counseling Today, Modern Reformation and Perspectives. He has also written editorials for a variety of newspapers.


Speaking

Dr. Groothuis is a gifted communicator who has the ability to challenge the highest level thinkers while remaining accessible to those who are not as academically inclined. He has spoken and preached on a wide range of topics, and that range expands every year. Some general categories in which he is competent 8801are theistic arguments, attacks on Christianity (the new atheism and similar movements), non-Christian spiritualities, cultural and social criticism, comparative religion, C.S. Lewis, the philosophy of Blaise Pascal, ethics, philosophy of technology, political philosophy, philosophy of jazz, aesthetics, and others. If you would like to have Dr. Groothuis speak at your conference or event, please send him an email at DougGroothuis@gmail.com.

The views expressed on this blog belong to Douglas Groothuis or a contributing author and do not represent, in any way, the official position of Denver Seminary.

13 thoughts

  1. Doug,

    Would you be available this Saturday afternoon to speak at a Colorado Centurions event (Centurion commissioning ceremony) in Colorado Springs? The event will be held at the Garden of the Gods resort.

    I am sorry for the late notice/request, we would pay for travel expenses, there will be an excellent dinner provided and there will be an honorarium.

    Please let me know if you are interested and available.

    Sincerely,

    Don Hood
    Colorado Centurions
    Co Chair

  2. Dear Mr. Groothuis,

    I want to begin by thanking you for your thoughtful questions regarding gay “marriage.” I have utilized them several times (when I did it in writing I cited you). One of the places I utilized it was on the Huffington post page in response to am “open letter” by someone claiming to be a gay minster of the Episcopal Church. One person did attempt to answer and I have several of my own thoughts, but I was curious to what you would reply. Here’s his answer:

    1) I have no moral authority God doesn’t want us judging each other.
    2) Love thy neighbor as yourself
    3) How can you deny your neighbor that which you claim yourself?
    6) It was right up until the 16th Century. Don’t believe me look it up.

    I didn’t skip/forget 4 or 5, that’s all he wrote. I would like to give him a pithy reply (short attention spans) so I’d be interested to hear how you would respond and if you reply if you would be willing to let me use your (or parts of) your reply. I guess the biggest one I have no idea on is the 16th century assertion, or course he gave no source or context and I am very busy studying for the bar exam (just graduated law school) so I’m pressed for time…

    Thank again for your post and in advance for your assistance.

    Sincerely,

    Todd Morelli

    1. This is not an argument. It is a collection of false ideas.

      1. What is the biblical passage on not judging at all. There is none. The person writing this is judging those who judge and is contradicting himself.

      2.Yes, love your neighbor. But love must work within a moral framework.

      3. I can deny my neighbor what does not belong to him: same-sex marriage. I deny my neighbor my wife, too.

      6. What was right unto the 16th century? Gay marriage? On what planet?

      The response you list is not a serious response at all.

      Doug

  3. Hello! I just read your article on Frank Schaeffer’s book. I wanted to say how much I appreciated it. I grew up reading L’Abri over and over and have just recently read about Franky Schaeffer and his books and beliefs. I was heartbroken honestly. Reading your article though about his book actually made me feel better. And it was so well done. I am now a follower. Thank you so much. Alisha Nelson

  4. Prof. Groothuis,

    I just wanted to write a message of sincere thanks and deep appreciation for your recent article in the November issue of Christianity Today. I read a lot of articles in magazines like CT and Touchstone and other Apologetics and Philosophically oriented publications. I find many intellectually thought-provoking, many spiritually motivating and many emotionally powerful pieces. Your recent article about your wife’s condition and the struggles that you’ve battled for so long at home really struck me in all three of these areas. I am a fairly new believer (I grew up Roman Catholic, but did not get saved until 2010 while serving in the military). The vehicle for my coming to Christ was my wife (at the time she first brought me to church, she was not yet my wife, but only an object of my fancy). Since my conversion five years ago, I have dedicated myself to the study of scripture and apologetics (I will be finishing my Master in Apologetics from Biola) next spring. After many years of confusion and sinful living, God has provided me with the opportunity to, as you mentioned early in your article, combine my passion with vocation. Still, there have been struggles at home that have left much of my newfound desire to work and serve the Lord in a certain tension with the reality of how to do so and how much to do. While we likely have not experienced the same degree of physical and emotional suffering that seems to have accompanied you and your wife, my wife has also struggled early on in our now five year old marriage with several minor, yet persistent, health issues and more severe bouts of depression than I ever would have expected when we first were married. Much of your article resonated with our situation, even if I feel that our circumstances are indeed inferior to your own (in some objective way). Still, it brought me to tears. Especially difficult is the thought of all the “good things” that one would have desired to share with a wife, but that never seem to get realized (vacations, church attendance, bible studies, etc.) because they simply cannot be. Your address to your students about finding meaning amidst such honest pain, also resonated deeply and I think gave me a mental image to hold on to as I pursue my own teaching career and ministry. In any case, I won’t ramble much longer, for I have to admit that we have also been blessed in ways that I never could have imagined (we have two lovely sons) and I wouldn’t want this to sound like a complaint, rather than a lament. Therefore, allow me again to simply express my gratitude for your honesty and your ability to communicate this very personal yet profound message to your fellow brothers and sisters in Christ. I believe that those who suffer greatest for Him, usually provide the greatest service to Him. I think you’ve touched on that in writing this article. Thank you.

    1. @ Anthony

      Thank you for sharing your story. My family is also going through a crushing, unbearable health situation. His article was so very helpful to me as well.

      I doubt Dr. Groothuis has time/ability to be reading these comments, much less respond. But if he ever does, I would like to express my thanks to him as well.

  5. The November 2015 CT lament also spoke to our hearts. We are the parents of a young woman who is 31 and started having serious fibromyalgia symptoms in 2006. Her symptoms continue to worsen and she is mostly housebound. She is married and lives in another state. We speak to her many times a week by phone, especially since her husband is a long distance trucker gone for 4 weeks at a time. (We thank God for her husband’s loving care for her and her encouraging emotional support for her husband.) It is hard to trust God for her future, but we are trying to stay in “today.”

    1. @ R&C Scott

      My heart goes out to your daughter and whole family.

      May we all continue to hang on to Christ, knowing that even when we don’t understand anything else in this confusing and painful world, we know that we have a God who suffered greatly when He walked this very same world. And not just physically on the cross, but emotionally and mentally and spiritually as well. What other religion offers a God like ours? I know of none. Just the fact that he knows what it’s like helps me hang on some days. Some days, it’s all I have.

      Most of all, we know that for those who follow Him, our agony will one day end and we will be in His presence forever! That is our true hope. It’s the one thing that keeps me hanging on, day by day.

  6. Dr. Grootius: I was one of your students more than a decade ago. I just listened to your podcast on the Eric Metaxas radio program. You are very articulate (I kind of expected that). I really appreciated your vulnerability and honesty. Dementia has also touched our family although not the same as what Becky has. I have sent the link of that podcast to many people. I have to say, I smiled after Eric M. said something to you about “rejoicing always…” And you said, “Well, I’ve not historically done that well.” I remember you as a very serious person.

  7. In regards to http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2004/november/10.78.html?start=1 , yes, we shouldn’t question, explore, and make our own thoughts and ideas… lol

    We choose and are told to have faith in a book, translated, re-written, compiled from scriptures and texts that are hand picked, removed, and added throught out 1500 years..by humans. All based from different cultures and religions.. which were to be “inspired” by “A” God.

    And we are told we should not question them.. that the romans for instance, among others, had no intent to modify it to its own ideology and belief and times, which it clearly states it did.

    That article is just another example how modern religion keeps us from questioning things, exploring our minds and seeing the truth (whatever that may be).

    God forbid god wouldn’t want us to do that, right?

    So much hypocrisy and agenda..

    Its really simple, how can you be part of one religion if you believe in one god? the amount of ignorance in modern Christianity is amazing, whats even more amazing is its fooling people.

  8. listening to point of view on afr…did some research about you and i was wondering what the circumstances are regarding being married without children. i am a highly inquisitive individual, and i apologize for such an invasive question. i do not want to be insensitive to your situation and pray god will continue to sustain you during this time.

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