Should We Legislate Morality?

12 thoughts on “Should We Legislate Morality?”

  1. Well said.
    “Some protest that religious people wrongly impose their views on others. Religion is a private and personal matter. “Get religion out of politics,” they cry. Ironically, when people say, religion is private and personal, they are trying to impose their view of religion on us. As evangelicals, we disagree with this view. Yet such people would demand that we act as though their view was true.

  2. “Some protest that religious people wrongly impose their views on others. Religion is a private and personal matter. “Get religion out of politics,” they cry. Ironically, when people say, “Religion is private and personal,” they are trying to impose their view of religion on us. As evangelicals, we disagree with this view. Yet such people would demand that we act as though their view was true.

  3. I agree with this 100%. One cannot legislate morality, that is, a particular legislation cannot coerce an individual to abide by the law, but can and should legislate the moral standard for a society. The Lord instituted the OT Law knowing very well that not one person would be able to keep the Law, until Jesus Christ who fulfilled it. Paul admonishes in Romans 7:7: “What shall we say then? Is the Law sin? May it never be! On the contrary, I would not have come to know sin except through the Law; for I would not have known about coveting if the Law had not said, “YOU SHALL NOT COVET.” It is important that Christians engage in politics and the public square, to ensure that morality, influenced by the Judeo-Christian values that governed the writing of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, continue to be at the root of future legislation.

  4. When it comes to “legislating morality,” my understanding about the concern about Christian involvement in government is some Christians advance ideas that are not susceptible to the democratic process. That is, when we are debating ideas, there is an assumption that we will all present evidence and that any of us might be persuaded by the other. There are Christian views, however, that seem to be justified by something that is out side that ordinary process of discussion. These are typically moral in nature. And because we can’t get at the justification for those views, we say that those Christians are tying to “legislate morality,” or ‘dictate moral things,’ might be a better way to express the same thought.

  5. I think it is where do we draw the line. We all agree that we should legislate morality. Murder and theft are only wrong because of our God given sense of right and wrong. Animals kill and steal food and nesting sites and there are no consequences because they are not created in God’s image, they have no conscience. So some would draw a line in the sand and say as long as it does not hurt some one else it is ok and we should mind our own business. To the Christian sinful actions can cause others to stumble in their walk with God or to keep them from finding salvation all together. Each and every sin done in public or with a second person hurts another person or person. Keeping a person away from eternal life with God is the most harm one can cause another.
    Christians have a difficult time expressing this view in a manner that does not seem like we are all just a bunch of control freaks trying to keep everyone in line. The ultimate goal is that none should perish.

    Our country has slowly moved toward immorality: drugs are legal, abortion is legal, divorce is common, now homosexuality is accepted next the pedophile and the serial killers and cleptomaniacs will claim they are genetically programmed to be who they are and demand the freedom to exercise their God given rights. Then what?

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